Working on Many Workbooks

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Working on Many Workbooks

Introduction

A workbook is primarily a document like any other in Microsoft Windows. This means that you can create a new workbook or you can open an existing workbook as we saw in the first lesson. Because Microsoft Excel is a multiple document interface (MDI) application, you can create or open many workbooks at the same time and be limited only by the memory on your computer. In fact, Microsoft Excel allows you to work on various workbooks at the same time as if they were one. For example, you can transfer the contents of columns or cells from one workbook to another on the same screen.

 

Microsoft Excel as an MDI

As mentioned already, Microsoft Excel is a multiple document interface (MDI). This means that the application allows you to create or open many documents, be able to switch from one to another, or be able to display all of them sharing the same screen.

If you create or open many workbooks and while you are working on them, each is represented on the taskbar by a button. You can click the button of the desired workbook on the taskbar to access it. As an alternative, on the Ribbon, you can click View. In the Window section, click Switch Windows and click the desired document. The workbook you are currently using would have a check mark on it:

To display many workbooks in the work area of Microsoft Excel, after creating or opening them, on the Ribbon, click View. In the Window section, click Arrange All. This would display the Arrange Window dialog box. From there you can select one of the radio buttons:

Arrange Windows

  • Tiled: The workbooks would display side by side:

Tiled

  • Horizontal: Each workbook would display horizontally

Horizontally

  • Vertically: The workbooks would display side by side:

  • Cascade: The workbooks would be presented one on top of the other:

To access a workbook:

  • You can click its title bar
  • On the Ribbon, click View. In the Window section, click Switch Windows, and select its name from the list

Practical LearningPractical Learning: Working With Many Workbooks

  1. To access one of the workbooks, on the taskbar, click BloodPressureTracker1
  2. To access another workbook, on the Ribbon, click View. In the Window section, click Switch Windows, and click TimeCard1 from the list

Viewing Many Workbooks

If you create or open many workbooks and while you are working on them, each is represented on the taskbar by a button. You can click the button of the desired workbook on the taskbar to access it. As an alternative, on the Ribbon, you can click View. In the Window section, click Switch Windows and click the desired document. The workbook you are currently using would have a check mark on it:

Viewing Workbooks Side-By-Side

One of the most valuable features of Microsoft Excel views is that you can juxtapose two or more workbooks to share the same screen. After creating or opening at least two workbooks, to let them share the screen allocated to Microsoft Excel, on the Ribbon, click View. In the Window section, click View Side by Side. This would open the Compare Side by Side dialog box. From there, click the workbook that will share the screen with the current workbook:

After making the selection, click OK. Each workbook would be displayed each horizontally while they are sharing the work area of Microsoft Excel. Each workbook would have a title bar on its top, the vertical and scroll bars:

To access a workbook:

  • You can click its title bar
  • On the Ribbon, click View. In the Window section, click Switch Windows, and select its name from the list

To close a workbook, you can click its system Close button.

Practical LearningPractical Learning: Viewing Workbooks Side-By-Side

  1. On the Ribbon, click View if necessary.
    To view the workbooks side by side, in the Window section, click View Side by Side
  2. In the Compare Side by Side dialog box, click the ExpenseReport1 and click OK
  3. Close each workbook without closing Microsoft Excel
  4. When asked whether you want to save, click No