Adding Cells

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Adding Cells

Creating Cells Vertically

As mentioned already, when Microsoft Excel starts, it creates billions of cells for you. As we will see in the next lessons, you can then use the cells to enter the values you want in your spreadsheet. As a list displays its values, you may want to insert a value between two existing cells.

In Lesson 2, we saw that you could insert a new column to get new cells on the left side of a series of existing cells. Instead of using the column to perform this operation, you can do it from inside the cells.

To add a new column:

  • Right-click a cell that belongs to the column that will follow the new column and click Insert... This would open the Insert dialog box. To insert a new column, click the Entire Column radio button before clicking OK:

  • Click a cell. On the Ribbon, click Home. In the Cells section, click the arrow button under Insert and click Insert Sheet Columns
  • Click a cell. On the Ribbon, click Home. In the Cells section, click the arrow under Insert and click Insert Cells... This would open the Insert dialog box. To insert a new column, click the Entire Column radio button and click OK

When you perform any of these operations, a new column would be created on the left side of the column whose cell was clicked or right-clicked:

To add more than one column, first select the cells, either in a range:

Cells Selection

Or at random:

Then:

  • Right-click one of the selected cells and click Insert... In the Insert dialog box, click the Entire Column radio button and click OK
  • Click a cell. On the Ribbon, click Home. In the Cells section, click the arrow under Insert and click Insert Sheet Columns
  • Click a cell. On the Ribbon, click Home. In the Cells section, click the arrow under Insert and click Insert Cells... This would open the Insert dialog box. To insert a new column, click the Entire Column radio button and click OK

When you perform one of these actions, if the cells were selected in a range, the same number of columns would be created on the left side of the range that was selected. If the selected cells where not adjacent, new columns would be created on the left side of the column of each cell that was selected or on the left side of each group of cells that were selected.

The techniques of inserting columns that we saw in Lesson 2 and above are used to add a complete column. Sometimes, you will want to create, add, or insert a new cell between two existing cells. To perform this operation vertically, you would ask Microsoft Excel to consider a cell, move all cells under it by one step down. Once this is done, you would be presented with a new empty cell where the other was.

To insert a cell vertically between two cells:

  • Right-click the cell that will be pushed down along with the cells under it, and click Insert...
     
    Insert
  • Click the cell that will be pushed down along with its bottom neighbors. On the ribbon, click Home. In the Cells section, click the arrow button under Insert, and click Insert Cells...

Any of these actions would call the Insert dialog box. From it, to insert a cell and push the other cells down, click the Shift Cells Down radio button:

When you click OK, each cell would be pushed down up to the cell that must be created:

In the same way, you can first select cells in a column, either in a range or randomly, and insert new cells.

To undo any of these actions:

  • On the Quick Access toolbar, click the Undo button Undo
  • Press Ctrl + Z

Creating Cells Horizontally

we saw that you could add a new row to get a new series of cells aligned horizontally. Those operations can also be performed from cells.

To add a new row:

  • Right-click a cell that belongs to the row that will be below the new row and click Insert... This would open the Insert dialog box. To insert a new row, click the Entire Row radio button and click OK
  • Click a cell. On the Ribbon, click Home. In the Cells section, click the arrow button under Insert and click Insert Sheet Sheet Rows
  • Click a cell. On the Ribbon, click Home. In the Cells section, click the arrow under Insert and click Insert Cells... This would open the Insert dialog box. To insert a new column, click the Entire Column radio button and click OK

Any of these actions would add a new row above the cell that was selected.

To add more than one column, first select the cells, either at random or in a range

Then:

  • Right-click one of the selected cells and click Insert... In the Insert dialog box, click the Entire Row radio button and click OK
  • Click a cell. On the Ribbon, click Home. In the Cells section, click the arrow under Insert and click Insert Sheet Rows
  • Click a cell. On the Ribbon, click Home. In the Cells section, click the arrow under Insert and click Insert Cells... This would open the Insert dialog box. To insert a new column, click the Entire Row radio button and click OK

If the cells were selected in a range, the same number of rows would be created above the cells. Imagine the selected cells where not adjacent:

Selected Cells

If you insert the rows, a new row would be inserted above each selected row:

Any of these techniques adds a complete row to the list. Sometimes, you will only want to add a new cell. You can ask Microsoft Excel to push some cell to the right and create room for one or more new cells.

To insert a cell horizontally between two cells:

  • Right-click the cell that will be pushed to the right along with the cells on its right, and click Insert...
  • Click the cell that will be pushed to the right along with its right neighbors. On the ribbon, click Home. In the Cells section, click the arrow button under Insert, and click Insert Cells...

Any of these actions would call the Insert dialog box. From it, to insert a cell and push the others to the right, click the Shift Cells Right radio button.

To undo any of these actions:

  • On the Quick Access toolbar, click the Undo button Undo
  • Press Ctrl + Z